The Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs

2023 APSAD Awards Highlights

The APSAD Awards were presented at APSAD Adelaide 2023 by Presidents Professor Leanne Hides and Dr Craig Rodgers. The 2023 APSAD Awards for Excellence in Science, Research and Practice were presented throughout the three-day conference program with the 10 APSAD Award recipients being recognised for having made an outstanding contribution to reducing the harms associated with alcohol and other drug use in Australasia.

2023 APSAD AWARDS RECIPIENTS

 Nico Clark

Nico Clark 23

Alison Beck

Alison Beck 2 23

Penny Hill

Penny Hill 2

 Kylie Lee & Craig Holloway

Kylie Craig

 Sara Farnbach

Sara Farnbach 23 3

 Chris Holmwood

Chris Holmwood 23

Senior Scientist Award - Professor Elizabeth Elliott

Professor Elizabeth Elliott AM FAHMS FRSN MD MPhil MBBS FRACP FRCPCH FRCPis a Distinguished Professor in Paediatrics and Child Health at the University of Sydney; Consultant Paediatrician at the Sydney Children’s Hospitals Network (Westmead) and holds a prestigious and highly competitive Medical Research Futures Fund Next Generation Fellowship, her third such Fellowship.

Elizabeth has dedicated her career to advancing the human rights, health, and quality of life for ill and disadvantaged children in Australia and beyond, through education, research, clinical care and advocacy. Specific examples include promoting the health and human rights of children disabled by rare diseases, fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) and vaccine-preventable and other infectious diseases; Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, particularly in remote Australia; asylum seeker and refugee children, particularly in Immigration detention; children receiving cochlear implants; children with Female Genital Mutilation (FGMC); and children with cerebral palsy, including in developing countries in our region, particularly Vietnam.

She is the spokesperson on child health for UNICEF Australia and consultant to the WHO and the US National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. She chairs the Australian Government’s national FASD Advisory Group and is a Board Director for the National Organisation for FASD and Royal Far West. She is widely published and has been recognised for her work nationally and internationally.

Mid Career Award - Associate Professor Kylie Lee

Kylie is deputy director of Indigenous Health and Substance Use in Addiction Medicine, at the University of Sydney and visiting research fellow, at the Centre for Alcohol Policy Research (La Trobe University). Her highly original research in alcohol and other drug use is led by community or health service requests. Kylie and her team have pioneered translational research approaches. She is the lead editor of a clinical textbook requested by Indigenous AOD workers nationally and has been invited to assist Inuit and Sri Lankan communities in knowledge translation. Her work has won national recognition including a 2011 Australian Teachers of Media (ATOM) Award for a film on problem drinking. Kylie has played a central role in supporting Aboriginal post-graduate research students, trainees and research assistants through the Centre of Research Excellence in Indigenous Health and Alcohol. Kylie’s mentoring is founded on respect and two-way learning.  Her generosity, care and dedication is deeply appreciated by those she mentors. And her love of research – and of fine cooking- is infectious.

Early Career Award - Dr Sara Farnbach

Sara is Program Lead, RISE Team (Research, Innovate, Strengthen, Embed) at the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre (NDARC), UNSW. She has passion for improving the health and wellbeing of vulnerable communities through evidence-based and tailored health service delivery. Her program is focused on preventing harms from alcohol and other drugs in rural and regional NSW and working collaboratively with communities to tailor health services to their setting. Her PhD research focused on facilitators to conducting high-quality and culturally-appropriate research focused on strengthening wellbeing with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. She has research experience working on qualitative designs, embedding evaluations into service delivery and RCTs.

Her current research is focused improving health service delivery to meet the needs of people with alcohol and other drug use problems. She has an interest in novel approaches to service evaluation, using routinely collected data and pragmatic trial designs.

Sara is a Registered Nurse with clinical experience in renal dialysis units in far north Queensland. She has a Masters of Public Health and Tropical Medicine and has worked in the Philippines and the Pacific on several programs including communicable disease control and maternal and child health. She has also worked on health promotion programs in Australia.

Early Career Award - Dr Alison Beck

Dr Alison Beck is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow and Clinical Psychologist based in the School of Psychology, University of Wollongong. She has extensive clinical and research experience working with adults attending mental health and alcohol and other drug treatment services. Her research is focused on improving the delivery and outcomes of psychosocial interventions for people affected by addictive behaviours and other mental health conditions.

Mentor Award - Dr Chris Holmwood

Chris is an Addiction Medicine Physician in Adelaide. Until recently he was Director of Clinical Partnerships with Drug and Alcohol Services South Australia. He is a member of the Chapter of Addiction Medicine Training Committee. Prior to working at DASSA he was Clinical Director of the South Australian Prison Health Service, and prior to that was State Director of the RACGP Training Program for SA/NT. His main professional interest is improving health service responses for people with substance use related problems.

Mentor Award - Professor Gillian Gould

Gillian Gould is Professor in Health Equity and recently completed an NHMRC Translating Research into Practice (TRIP) Fellow, co-funded by Cancer Institute NSW, at Southern Cross University. She is an active vocationally registered GP with >30 years' experience, and a Tobacco Treatment Specialist. Her clinical work is at the Coffs Harbour Refugee Health Clinic which she co-founded in 2006. Previously a founding academic at UNSW Faculty of Medicine Rural Clinical School 2002-11, Head of Campus Rural Clinical school, senior research fellow. Gould is committed to supporting regional research.

First Peoples Award - Rebecca Hyland

Rebecca Hyland is a proud Kamilaroi woman, currently living, working and raising her two jarjums on Gumbaynggirr Country. Rebecca is the Senior Project Manager for iSISTAQUIT. Rebecca’s career has taken her across Australia, and over the past 19 years First Nations engagement has always been a key focus. Rebecca is most passionate about empowering through education, health outcomes for mob, and First Nations leadership. Rebecca’s passion for smoking cessation in communities has been both a professional and personal journey. Rebecca enjoys spending time with her family going on bush walks, stand up paddle boarding and being active.

First Peoples Award - Craig Holloway

Craig Holloway is a proud Yorta Yorta man and an outstanding representative for Koori peoples in Victoria in his chosen field of alcohol and other drug use and health. He has worked in the alcohol and other drug use sector in Victoria as a front line worker, executive director, director and manager for more than a quarter of a century. He has longstanding experience working for the community controlled health sector where his greatest pride is doing his best for his community. Craig's thoughtful and significant contributions have also been recognised on the national stage, by his ministerial appointment as Victorian member of the National Indigenous Drug and Alcohol Committee (NIDAC; now de-funded). Cultural safety and cultural overlay have underpinned all areas of Craig’s work. In 2019 he was recognised with the First Australians Award (National Alcohol and Other Drugs Excellence and Innovation Award), and the Excellence Award, Male worker from the National Indigenous Drug and Alcohol Committee (2018).

Clinician Award - Dr Nico Clark

Nico Clark, based in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, is currently a Head, Addiction Medicine Service at The Royal Melbourne Hospital & Northwestern Mental Health, bringing experience from previous roles at DASSA-WHO Collaborating Centre for Research in the Treatment of Drug and Alcohol, the North Richmond Community Health, Drug and Alcohol Services South Australia, and University of Adelaide. He has worked in a range of settings including recently starting a new position as Consultant at the World Health Organization, Alcohol Drugs and Addictive Behaviours Team.

Advocacy Award - Dr Penny Hill

Penny Hill is the Prompt Response Network Lead and Emerging Drugs Research Fellow at NCCRED. She has a background in the community health and harm reduction sectors, working and volunteering in needle syringe programs, primary health care facilities and drug checking services in Australia and internationally. She is currently completing her PhD with the Burnet Institute, investigating opioid overdose among a cohort of people who inject drugs, and holds a Master of Science (Public Health), Graduate Diploma in Development Studies (International Development), and Bachelor of Health Sciences. She is a current board member of Harm Reduction Victoria, Harm Reduction Australia, the Vienna NGO Committee on Drugs, the International Drug Policy Consortium’s Members Advisory Council, and is the co-founder of Students for Sensible Drug Policy Australia.

 

2022 Award Highlights

The APSAD Awards were presented at the 41st APSAD Darwin Conference by President Professor Leanne Hides. The 2022 APSAD Awards for Excellence in Science, Research and Practice were presented throughout the three-day conference program with the eight APSAD Award recipients being recognised for having made an outstanding contribution to reducing the harms associated with alcohol and other drug use in Australasia.

2022 APSAD AWARD RECIPIENTS

APSAD Award winners Benjamin Riordan (EC winner) Robyn Williams (FP winner)Benjamin Riordan;
Robynn Williams
APSAD Award-winners-Mlivingston-KLee-and-VCock.jpg
Michael Livingston, Leanne Hides;
Kylie Lee and Victoria Cock
APSAD Advocacy Award winner NUAA Mary Harrod with President Leanne Hides Mary Harrod (NUAA) & Leanne Hides

APSAD Senior Scientist Award winner Wayne HallWayne Hall

 

Senior Scientist Award Professor Wayne Hall

Wayne Hall is Emeritus Professor at the National Centre for Youth Substance Use Research (NCYSUR) at the University of Queensland (January 2021-). He was a Visiting Professor at the National Addiction Centre, Kings College London (2009-2019) and a Visiting Professor at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (2010-2021); and the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, UNSW (since 2001). Wayne was formerly Professorial Fellow (2017-2020) in and Director of the National Centre for Youth Substance Abuse Research (2014-2016), an NHMRC Australia Fellow in addiction neuroethics at the University of Queensland Centre for Clinical Research and the Queensland Brain Institute, UQ (2009-2015); Professor of Public Health Policy in the School of Population Health (2005-2010); Director of the Office of Public Policy and Ethics at the Institute for Molecular Bioscience (2001-2005) at the University of Queensland; and Director of the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, UNSW (1994-2001).
 

Mid Career Award Dr Michael Livingston

Dr Livingston is a leading Australian alcohol policy researcher, with a strong international reputation and an excellent track record of grant and publication success. His work is primarily quantitative, and focused on evaluating and understanding the effects of changes to alcohol policy, as well as developing a broader knowledge of the drivers of population changes in rates of drinking and alcohol-related harm. He is currently based at the Melbourne office of the National Drug Research Institute but maintains a strong connection with CAPR. Michael's PhD examined the relationship between changes in alcohol outlet density in Melbourne and rates of alcohol-related harms, producing important new evidence that liquor licensing has a key role to play in limiting harm from alcohol. Subsequently, Michael has undertaken a number of projects focusing on risky drinking among young people, including an analysis of recent trends and an examination of individual and environmental factors associated with regular high-risk drinking. 
 

Early Career Award Dr Benjamin Riordan

Benjamin Riordan is a post-doctoral research fellow in the Centre for Alcohol Policy Research (CAPR). Prior to moving to CAPR, he was a post doctoral researcher in Addiction Medicine at the University of Sydney (where he is still an affiliate; 2019-ongoing), he was a Fulbright Fellow at Brown University (2017-2018; Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies) and completed his PhD at the University of Otago (2019; Department of Psychology). His research interests are broad, but predominantly he focuses on using emerging and new technologies to understand and intervene with young adults who use alcohol. He is currently working on two projects that aim to measure the impact of alcohol outlet density on domestic and non-domestic assault, funded by the independent liquor and gaming authority to inform licencing decisions and policy. He is also working on a funded VESKI grant measuring the prevalence of alcohol and alcohol marketing on Instagram in Australia and Israel.

Mentor Award  Dr Kylie Lee

Kylie is deputy director of Indigenous Health and Substance Use in Addiction Medicine, at the University of Sydney and visiting research fellow, at the Centre for Alcohol Policy Research (La Trobe University). Her highly original research in alcohol and other drug use is led by community or health service requests. Kylie and her team have pioneered translational research approaches. She is the lead editor of a clinical textbook requested by Indigenous AOD workers nationally and has been invited to assist Inuit and Sri Lankan communities in knowledge translation. Her work has won national recognition including a 2011 Australian Teachers of Media (ATOM) Award for a film on problem drinking. Kylie has played a central role in supporting Aboriginal post-graduate research students, trainees and research assistants through the Centre of Research Excellence in Indigenous Health and Alcohol. Kylie’s mentoring is founded on respect and two-way learning.  Her generosity, care and dedication is deeply appreciated by those she mentors. And her love of research – and of fine cooking- is infectious.

First Peoples Award Dr Robyn Williams

Dr Robyn Williams is an Aboriginal (Noongar) woman, early career researcher and long-term advocate dedicated to improving the lives of individuals with FASD and their families. Dr Williams has extensive research, practice and policy experience. Her PhD thesis focused on understanding the experiences and needs of Aboriginal families supporting individuals with FASD. This is the largest study to date in Australia involving 180 Aboriginal people in Western Australia and provided vital knowledge regarding culturally responsive FASD-informed care for Aboriginal people. Dr Williams was awarded a Chancellors commendation for excellence for her PhD studies. Dr Williams is passionate about increasing access to culturally appropriate, community-based FASD-informed care. She is currently leading the development of a National Aboriginal FASD train-the-trainer curriculum that will be able to be delivered across multiple sectors, including Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services, AOD, mental health and child protection.

Clinician Award  Dr Victoria Cock

Dr Victoria Cock is the Clinical Director of Drug and Alcohol Services South Australia. Victoria has been a doctor for over 20 years having graduated from the University of Cape Town in 1998. The first decade of her career was spent working as a Family Physician in marginalised peri-urban communities in South Africa. It was during this time that she developed a great interest in the management of HIV in these marginalised communities and became a clinical lead in the rollout of anti-retroviral treatment on a large scale in South Africa in the early 2000s amidst much political turmoil. Victoria emigrated to Australia with her husband and 2 sons in 2008. It was here that she embarked on physician training through the RACP and undertook advanced training in Addiction Medicine. She obtained her fellowship in 2015 and has been working as an Addiction Medicine Specialist Physician with Drug and Alcohol Services of South Australia (DASSA) since.

Advocacy Award NSW Users and AIDS Association

The NSW Users and AIDS Association (NUAA) is a peer-based drug user organisation that is governed, staffed and led by people with lived experience of drug use. Their vision statement is “Advancing the rights, health and dignity of people who use drugs illicitly in NSW”. They are funded by NSW Health for service delivery with a focus on harm reduction and community empowerment. Our flagship programs include our peer-led NSP, Users News, peer education and support, stigma and discrimination training for health care professionals and DanceWize NSW. NUAA strives to improve our advocacy for, and services supporting, the diversity of people impacted by stigma and discrimination caused by the criminalisation of drug use across NSW. We work with a broad range of stakeholders and partners to support improved service delivery and system change. https://nuaa.org.au/our-vision

 

 

2023 APSAD Awards Highlights

The APSAD Awards were presented at APSAD Adelaide 2023 by Presidents Professor Leanne Hides and Dr Craig Rodgers. The 2023 APSAD Awards for Excellence in Science, Research and Practice were presented throughout the three-day conference program with the 10 APSAD Award recipients being recognised for having made an outstanding contribution to reducing the harms associated with alcohol and other drug use in Australasia.

2023 APSAD AWARDS RECIPIENTS

Nico ClarkNico Clark 23

Alison BeckAlison Beck 23 Kylie Lee & Craig HollowayKylie Craig

Sara FarnbachSara Farnbach 23 3

Penny HillPenny Hill 2

Chris HolmwoodChris Holmwood 23

 

Senior Scientist Award - Professor Elizabeth Elliott
Professor Elizabeth Elliott AM FAHMS FRSN MD MPhil MBBS FRACP FRCPCH FRCPis a Distinguished Professor in Paediatrics and Child Health at the University of Sydney; Consultant Paediatrician at the Sydney Children’s Hospitals Network (Westmead) and holds a prestigious and highly competitive Medical Research Futures Fund Next Generation Fellowship, her third such Fellowship. 

Elizabeth has dedicated her career to advancing the human rights, health, and quality of life for ill and disadvantaged children in Australia and beyond, through education, research, clinical care and advocacy. Specific examples include promoting the health and human rights of children disabled by rare diseases, fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) and vaccine-preventable and other infectious diseases; Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, particularly in remote Australia; asylum seeker and refugee children, particularly in Immigration detention; children receiving cochlear implants; children with Female Genital Mutilation (FGMC); and children with cerebral palsy, including in developing countries in our region, particularly Vietnam.

She is the spokesperson on child health for UNICEF Australia and consultant to the WHO and the US National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. She chairs the Australian Government’s national FASD Advisory Group and is a Board Director for the National Organisation for FASD and Royal Far West. She is widely published and has been recognised for her work nationally and internationally.

Mid Career Award - Associate Professor Kylie Lee
Kylie is deputy director of Indigenous Health and Substance Use in Addiction Medicine, at the University of Sydney and visiting research fellow, at the Centre for Alcohol Policy Research (La Trobe University). Her highly original research in alcohol and other drug use is led by community or health service requests. Kylie and her team have pioneered translational research approaches. She is the lead editor of a clinical textbook requested by Indigenous AOD workers nationally and has been invited to assist Inuit and Sri Lankan communities in knowledge translation. Her work has won national recognition including a 2011 Australian Teachers of Media (ATOM) Award for a film on problem drinking. Kylie has played a central role in supporting Aboriginal post-graduate research students, trainees and research assistants through the Centre of Research Excellence in Indigenous Health and Alcohol. Kylie’s mentoring is founded on respect and two-way learning.  Her generosity, care and dedication is deeply appreciated by those she mentors. And her love of research – and of fine cooking- is infectious.

Early Career Award - Sara Farnbach
Sara is Program Lead, RISE Team (Research, Innovate, Strengthen, Embed) at the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre (NDARC), UNSW. She has passion for improving the health and wellbeing of vulnerable communities through evidence-based and tailored health service delivery. Her program is focused on preventing harms from alcohol and other drugs in rural and regional NSW and working collaboratively with communities to tailor health services to their setting. Her PhD research focused on facilitators to conducting high-quality and culturally-appropriate research focused on strengthening wellbeing with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. She has research experience working on qualitative designs, embedding evaluations into service delivery and RCTs.
Her current research is focused improving health service delivery to meet the needs of people with alcohol and other drug use problems. She has an interest in novel approaches to service evaluation, using routinely collected data and pragmatic trial designs.
Sara is a Registered Nurse with clinical experience in renal dialysis units in far north Queensland. She has a Masters of Public Health and Tropical Medicine and has worked in the Philippines and the Pacific on several programs including communicable disease control and maternal and child health. She has also worked on health promotion programs in Australia.
 
Early Career Award - Dr Alison Beck
Dr Alison Beck is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow and Clinical Psychologist based in the School of Psychology, University of Wollongong. She has extensive clinical and research experience working with adults attending mental health and alcohol and other drug treatment services. Her research is focused on improving the delivery and outcomes of psychosocial interventions for people affected by addictive behaviours and other mental health conditions.
 
Mentor Award - Dr Chris Holmwood
Chris is an Addiction Medicine Physician in Adelaide. Until recently he was Director of Clinical Partnerships with Drug and Alcohol Services South Australia. He is a member of the Chapter of Addiction Medicine Training Committee. Prior to working at DASSA he was Clinical Director of the South Australian Prison Health Service, and prior to that was State Director of the RACGP Training Program for SA/NT. His main professional interest is improving health service responses for people with substance use related problems.
 
Mentor Award - Professor Gillian Gould
Gillian Gould is Professor in Health Equity and recently completed an NHMRC Translating Research into Practice (TRIP) Fellow, co-funded by Cancer Institute NSW, at Southern Cross University. She is an active vocationally registered GP with >30 years' experience, and a Tobacco Treatment Specialist. Her clinical work is at the Coffs Harbour Refugee Health Clinic which she co-founded in 2006. Previously a founding academic at UNSW Faculty of Medicine Rural Clinical School 2002-11, Head of Campus Rural Clinical school, senior research fellow. Gould is committed to supporting regional research.
First Peoples Award - Rebecca Hyland
Rebecca Hyland is a proud Kamilaroi woman, currently living, working and raising her two jarjums on Gumbaynggirr Country. Rebecca is the Senior Project Manager for iSISTAQUIT. Rebecca’s career has taken her across Australia, and over the past 19 years First Nations engagement has always been a key focus. Rebecca is most passionate about empowering through education, health outcomes for mob, and First Nations leadership. Rebecca’s passion for smoking cessation in communities has been both a professional and personal journey. Rebecca enjoys spending time with her family going on bush walks, stand up paddle boarding and being active.
First Peoples Award - Craig Holloway
Craig Holloway is a proud Yorta Yorta man and an outstanding representative for Koori peoples in Victoria in his chosen field of alcohol and other drug use and health. He has worked in the alcohol and other drug use sector in Victoria as a front line worker, executive director, director and manager for more than a quarter of a century. He has longstanding experience working for the community controlled health sector where his greatest pride is doing his best for his community. Craig's thoughtful and significant contributions have also been recognised on the national stage, by his ministerial appointment as Victorian member of the National Indigenous Drug and Alcohol Committee (NIDAC; now de-funded). Cultural safety and cultural overlay have underpinned all areas of Craig’s work. In 2019 he was recognised with the First Australians Award (National Alcohol and Other Drugs Excellence and Innovation Award), and the Excellence Award, Male worker from the National Indigenous Drug and Alcohol Committee (2018).
Clinician Award - Dr Nico Clark
Nico Clark, based in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, is currently a Head, Addiction Medicine Service at The Royal Melbourne Hospital & Northwestern Mental Health, bringing experience from previous roles at DASSA-WHO Collaborating Centre for Research in the Treatment of Drug and Alcohol, the North Richmond Community Health, Drug and Alcohol Services South Australia, and University of Adelaide. He has worked in a range of settings including recently starting a new position as Consultant at the World Health Organization, Alcohol Drugs and Addictive Behaviours Team.

Advocacy Award - Dr Penny Hill
Penny Hill is the Prompt Response Network Lead and Emerging Drugs Research Fellow at NCCRED. She has a background in the community health and harm reduction sectors, working and volunteering in needle syringe programs, primary health care facilities and drug checking services in Australia and internationally. She is currently completing her PhD with the Burnet Institute, investigating opioid overdose among a cohort of people who inject drugs, and holds a Master of Science (Public Health), Graduate Diploma in Development Studies (International Development), and Bachelor of Health Sciences. She is a current board member of Harm Reduction Victoria, Harm Reduction Australia, the Vienna NGO Committee on Drugs, the International Drug Policy Consortium’s Members Advisory Council, and is the co-founder of Students for Sensible Drug Policy Australia.

 

2021 Awards Highlights

With the move of this year's conference to entirely online due to COVID-19, the annual APSAD Awards ceremony was held online within the conference program.

APSAD President Professor Michael Farrell presented the 2021 APSAD Awards for Excellence in Science, Research and Practice. The eight recipients of the APSAD Awards are recognised as having made an outstanding contribution to reducing the harms associated with alcohol and other drug use in Australasia.

 

2021 APSAD AWARD RECIPIENTS

Leanne Hides Senior Scientist Award editSenior Scientist Award 
Leanne Hides
Peter Kelly Mid Career Award edit Mid Career Award
Peter Kelly
Nicola Newton Mid Career Award
Mid Career Award
Nicola Newton
Cass_Wright_-_Early_Career_Award_winner_edit.jpgEarly Career Award
Cassandra Wright
Moana Tane First Peoples Award edit
First Peoples Award
Moana Tane
Cath_Chapman_-_Mentor_Award_edit.jpg
Mentor Award
Cath Chapman
Lynette_Bullen_-_Clinician_Award.jpg 
Clinician Award
Lynette Bullen
Grace Oh Advocacy Award edit 
Advocacy Award
Grace Oh 

 

Senior Scientist Award Professor Leanne Hides

Over the last 20 years, Leanne has made an outstanding contribution to the development of the evidence base for psychological treatments for primary alcohol and other drug (AOD) and mental health problems in young people. Her wealth of clinical experience working as a psychologist in both mental health and substance use treatment settings has provided with Leanne the skills and knowledge to engage this extremely challenging population in clinical trials research. Much of this research is conducted in partnership with AOD services in real-world clinical settings, to ensure the research can be translated into practice.

Leanne has an exceptional track record in AOD research. She has received prestigious fellowships (ARC Future Fellowship, 2012-2016; NHMRC Senior Research Fellowship, 2017-2021), and has 201 publications including 186 peer-refereed journal articles and 15 book chapters. Her success in obtaining grants is outstanding: since 2010 she has been a chief investigator on 15 NHMRC grants, including leading our recent NHMRC Research Excellence grant (2021-2025). Leanne's outstanding combination of clinical research and implementation science skills will ensure she continues to make a significant contribution to the development of evidence-based AOD treatments and their translation into AOD services. 

Her leadership in the field of clinical psychology is evident in her appointment as President of the Australian Association of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (AACBT 2010-2014) and she is the incoming president for APSAD, after serving as the Queensland APSAD representative for 6 years.

Mid Career Award A/Prof Nicola Newton

Nicola is an exceptional research leader with a national and international reputation. As Director of Prevention, she leads a large program of prevention research at the Matilda Centre for Research in Mental Health and Substance Use, using innovative digital technologies in large scale trials, and fast-tracking research into practice.

Nicola has developed and commercialised the first effective eHealth prevention programs for substance use, known as Climate Schools. The effectiveness of the Climate Schools programs has been established through seven RCTs in an impressive 14,663 students from 169 schools, and she has provided world-first evidence that eHealth preventive interventions can significantly delay the uptake of alcohol use, reduce binge drinking, reduce illicit drug use, and reduce psychological distress. Of great importance, this evidence has been subject to translation strategies so that her work has reached nearly one thousand schools, more than 26,000 students and 2,300 teachers. Nicola has established an independent program of research, supervising a large team of research staff and students to address the evidence gaps in prevention and the need for improved sustainability.

She has an impressive research trajectory with international and national recognition of her innovative research. She has published a highly impressive 120 peer-reviewed articles, 11 book chapters, 30 reports and 22 drug education resources. Her research has been cited over 3,000 times with average citations per publication three times that of her field (Scimago Journal Rank). Her international standing is reflected in her research being presented >200 times at leading national and international, psychology and addiction conferences, including 22 invited keynotes. As a leading scholar in mental health and substance use prevention, she regularly contributes to public debate. Nicola has attracted over $37 million and led over 59 grants and she is the recipient of 21 national and international awards in recognition of her research excellence.

Mid Career Award A/Prof Peter Kelly

Pete has developed into one of the leading researchers in our field and has established, and continues to lead, an innovative program of research that is focused on improving treatment in the alcohol and other drug sector. His research is conducted at the ‘coal face’ of clinical practice. He is the leading researcher in Australia focused on the non-government treatment sector. This is an often overlooked sector by the research community and it presents enormous challenges for conducting high-quality research (e.g. poorly resourced for research, high staff turnover, traditionally low integration of evidence-based care). However, the NGO sector increasingly plays an extremely important role in the provision of services. The research that Pete is conducting is vital to ensuring high-quality service provision for the large number of Australians accessing NGO services each day.

Pete has established highly impactful partnerships with a range of the leading services providers (e.g. SMART Recovery, We Help Ourselves, The Salvation Army, Odyssey House, Kedesh, St Vincent de Paul). He has done this by really engaging with the clients and clinicians of the services, and working with service providers to deliver highly collaborative research projects. As evidenced by his international leadership of SMART Recovery research, Pete is highly respected both Nationally and Internationally for his research. His work is very well funded by a range of leading State and Nationally competitive funding bodies. Likewise, he has been highly productive in publishing his work (124 journal publications). As recognised by his series of awards (e.g. Excellence in Research Award, National Drug and Alcohol Award; Excellence in Research and Evaluation, NSW NGO Awards), his research is highly valued for the impact that it makes to the field. Likewise, his recent NHMRC success talks to the importance for Pete’s program of research. Pete is the Co-Director of the new NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence (CRE) in Alcohol and Other Drug Sector Capacity Building for Outcome Focused, Evidence-Based and Cost-effective Care (2021-2025, Under Embargo). This new CRE is very exciting for our sector and clearly recognises Pete as an important leader in our field.

Early Career Award Dr Cassandra Wright

Dr Wright has made an important and significant contribution to the alcohol and other drug sector since coming to the sector in 2015. This contribution is summarised in a series of papers connected to the development and implementation of the Mobile Intervention for Drinking in Young People (MIDY) intervention. This seminal work produced an internationally unique intervention designed to influence drinking occasions of young people. Based on a series of interactive and tailored text messages, the intervention was co-designed with young people themselves ensuring acceptability. Dr Wright led all aspects of the work in collaboration with her PhD supervisor Dr Megan Lim and findings from initial development of MIDY led to a prestigious National Health and Medical Research Council Project grant being awarded in 2017 to continue the body of work. Ultimately, this pioneering work has advanced the field significantly, highlighting the importance of co-design principles and the potential for using new technologies for intervening during actual drinking events to reduce alcohol consumption and related harms.

Mentor Award  A/Prof Cath Chapman

Cath’s energy, drive and enthusiasm for others is infectious. In addition to providing skills, opportunities and experiences necessary to become a successful academic leader, Cath currently works with over 80 researchers to instil the self-belief needed to realise their potential. She works to create systems that support and build the next generation. The many young researchers whose careers have been fostered by Cath are the future leaders in drug and alcohol research. The awards, publications and grants they have obtained including prestigious NHMRC fellowships are impressive. Cath’s dedication and passion is central to her approach in her leadership of two major initiatives I would like to highlight. Cath is program lead of a prestigious NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence in Prevention and Early Intervention in Mental Disorders and Substance Use. This multi-institution initiative exists to build capacity in the field. It brings together over 100 researchers, policy makers and people with lived experience.
 
Cath has established competitive mentoring programs across national and international universities to reach these goals. Recognising the need for structures and mentoring of the youth voice in research she established a Youth Advisory Board, the first focusing on alcohol, drugs and mental health. Through just this one successful awarding winning program she has mentored over 20 young people in research engagement. Impressively, she is chair of the largest learning network in the country, The Mental Health Services Network of Australia and New Zealand, with over 1000 people a year attending meetings. Through this network, her mentoring reach and innovation extend well beyond traditional boundaries directly to people delivering care to the most vulnerable in our community.
 
Cath is incredibly generous in her mentorship and her exceptional generosity, her mentees have benefited enormously and that generosity has allowed them to succeed. Cath truly embodies the vision of “pay it forward”.
 

First Peoples Award Dr Moana Pera Tane

Dr Tane has a strong background in corporate leadership and executive management within the Health and Social Services industries in both Australia and New Zealand (Maori Health, health equity, Aboriginal Medical Services, Aboriginal Primary Health Care and Public Health, Mental Health, Alcohol and Other Drugs, Environmental Health). A comprehensive background in Indigenous smoking cessation (NZ and Australia), national training and implementation of the NZ. Smoking Cessation Guidelines to the non-regulated Maori smoking cessation workforce (Aukati Kai Paipa program). Design, development and implementation of smoking cessation training for Aboriginal Health Workers, RNs and GPs providing smoking cessation advice as routine primary health care in very remote Yolngu communities (Laynhapuy Homelands Health Service).
Community-based postgraduate researcher in New Zealand (Master of Public Health - first-class honors) and in Australia, a decolonised research study in East Arnhem Land investigating smoking, stigma and leadership among the
Yolngu people of the region (Doctor of Philosophy, Indigenous Health, Menzies School of Health Research and Charles Darwin University. In 2020, Post-doctoral Research Fellow iSISTAQUIT, School of Medicine and Public
Health, University of Newcastle and currently an Associate Investigator on a research project, funded by Global Alliance on Chronic Diseases and NHMRC.
Industry experience in Maori and Aboriginal health promotion, public health and tobacco control (NZ and Australia)

Extensive experience living and working in very remote Aboriginal communities (East Arnhem Land NT, Kimberley WA, Ngaanyatjarra Lands Central Desert) and regional communities (Broome WA, Kalgoorlie, Goldfields, WA). Previous experience (evidence to the Select Committee Inquiry: impact of tobacco on Maori), policy recommendations for clinical governance and oversight (East Arnhem Land and Ngaanyatjarra Lands) and ongoing leadership in strategy and policy design for the Tupeka Kore Te Taitokerau (Northland) Tupeka Kore (Tobacco Free) Strategy (in train). Recipient Australian Postgraduate Award 2014; published author (five publications in international academic journals).

Clinician Award Lynette Bullen

Lynette Bullen is a Wiradjuri woman who has worked in drugs and alcohol for near 30 years in urban, regional, rural and remote NSW. She has held a range of roles, from being a mothercraft nurse in a women’s residential rehabilitation service to an alcohol and other drug counsellor and aftercare coordinator. Since 2012, she has been employed at the Involuntary Drug and Alcohol Treatment Unit in Orange as a Senior
Drug and Alcohol Clinician. She strives to ensure optimum care for her clients (and their family) and has been a leading voice to ensure care delivered in IDAT is culturally safe and inclusive of local services based in the client’s home community. She sees this as key to ensuring seamless care once a client is discharged from IDAT and heads back at home. Alongside her clinical duties, Lynette has been involved with research and research translation for many years. She is the ‘female English’ voice on the Grog Survey App an accurate and acceptable tool designed to help Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples describe how much they drink. She is a member of the working group advising the development of the Drug Survey App (NHMRC-funded Ideas grant). She is an author of a chapter in an edited clinical text requested by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander alcohol and other drug workforce nationally (published in 2012). More recently, she is undertaking a Health Education and Training Institute (HETI) Rural Research Capacity Building Program through NSW Health. Supported in this study by the NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence in Indigenous Health and Alcohol, Lynette is leading a study that is examining factors that influence referrals of Aboriginal clients to involuntary drug and alcohol care in NSW. Lynette is a member of the Western NSW Local Health District Human Research Ethics Committee and in 2020 she received the Western Health Research Network Emerging Researcher’s Presentation Award.

Advocacy Award Grace Oh 

Grace Oh is a Senior Workforce Development Officer at the Mental Health Commission (MHC) WA. Grace is the WA Naloxone Project Lead and works collaboratively with alcohol and other drugs and Health services to deliver state-wide WA Naloxone Programs. Grace currently sits on the MHC Overdose Strategy Group and Early Warning System as well as the National Naloxone Reference Group. Grace has 20 years’ experience in the alcohol and other drugs sector and is passionate about innovative Harm Reduction and Peer Education approaches to reduce drug-related harm and deaths in the WA community. Grace is also Principal Consultant for Australian Drug Education & Consultancy, providing drug education for safer events and reducing drug-related harm in the community.

 

Advocacy Award Information

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NEW AWARD CATEGORY FOR 2021

As part of the Society's 40th Anniversary celebrations, we are announcing a new Award Category. The Advocacy Award will recognise the outstanding impact by an individual or a team in the alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs sector who works in the policy and/or advocacy area.

This is the first APSAD Award open to teams and the recipient of the 2021 Advocacy Award will have the opportunity to hold an Advocacy Workshop at the 2021 APSAD Brisbane Conference.

Details for the new Advocacy Award:

The Advocacy Award recognises the outstanding impact by an individual or a team in the alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs sector who works in the policy and/or advocacy area.

Eligibility

  • Any individual or team who has made an outstanding impact in policy and/or advocacy in the alcohol, tobacco and other drugs field, and can demonstrate one or more of the achievements below;
  • Positive advancement in the understanding of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs issues in a given community or population group, or
  • Advocacy for an advancement that is in the public interest (public health or welfare and/or criminal justice), evidence based (evidence that it will work as intended), and has a focus on reducing drug related harm, or
  • Positive policy change for the alcohol, tobacco and other drugs field. Change could occur in the following areas but are not limited to; legislative, government, and community, or
  • Strategy formation, e.g. strategic thinking, coalition formation, government liaison, key messaging.

Selection Criteria

Evidence of the impact made in the alcohol, tobacco and other drugs field. The nomination should clearly describe the achievements to be honoured, the scope and depth of the impact, and the processes used by the nominee, including for instance strategy formation and the use of evidence to underpin the advocacy/policy.

Further Details:

  • Nominations can be for any individual or team that meets the criteria for the Advocacy Award category.
  • APSAD Membership is not a prerequisite, nor is it of any advantage or disadvantage during the nomination process.
  • The nominator must be a current (financial) member of APSAD. Any member can nominate across multiple Award Categories.
  • Nominations close 7 September 2021, the Award recipient is announced in October and is given the opportunity to organise a workshop at the 40th APSAD Conference in Brisbane.
  • The Recipients for all Award Categories are announced at the official Awards Ceremony held during the 40th APSAD Conference in Brisbane on 8-10 November.

Head to the Awards page for the Information pack and nomination form.

 

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