The Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs

APSAD Awards Past Winners

YEAR EARLY CAREER AWARD SENIOR SCIENTIST AWARD FIRST PEOPLES AWARD CLINICIAN AWARD MENTOR
AWARD
2018 A/Prof Gillian Gould Prof Nicholas Lintzeris - - Prof Billie Bonevski
2017 Dr Briony Larance Prof Dan Lubman Scott Wilson Stephen Ling Dr Ingrid van Beek
2016 Dr Louise Mewton Prof Louisa Degenhardt Brad Freeburn Lisa Ferguson Prof Alison Ritter
2015 Dr Amy Peacock Prof Steve Allsop Kathleen James Rose McCrohan A/Prof Raimondo Bruno
2014 Dr Sarah Larney Prof Maree Teesson Jimmy Perry A/Prof Adrian Dunlop -
2013 Dr Matthew Gullo Prof Paul Haber Steve Ella - -
2012 Dr Adrian Carter Prof Alison Ritter Annalee Stearne - -
2011 Dr Suzanne Nielsen Prof David Kavanagh Uncle Jack - -
2010 Michael Livingston Prof Amanda Baker - - -
2009 Dr Frances Kay-Lambkin Prof Robyn Richmond Kim Gates - -
2008 Dr Leanne Hides Prof Robin Room - - -
2007 Dr Katherine Mills Prof Kate Conigrave - - -
2006 Prof Tanya Chikritzhs Prof Shane Darke - - -
2005 A/ Prof Alan Clough Dr James Bell - - -
2004 A/ Prof Kyp Kypri Prof Jason White - - -

2011: First Peoples Award introduced | 2014: Clinician Award introduced | 2015: Mentor Award introduced 


2018 APSAD Award Winners announced 

The APSAD Conference Dinner and Awards was held at Maritime Room Auckland. The recipients of the APSAD Awards are recognised as having made an outstanding contribution to reducing the harms associated with alcohol and other drug use in Australasia. It is a special experience to formally acknowledge the dedication of our peers and celebrate the quality of their work. 

 Award winners group photo reduce size
Left to Right: APSAD President Anthony (Tony) Gill; Gillian Gould; Nicholas Lintzeris; Billie Bonevski
 
Early Career Award Winner Gillian Gould
 
A/Prof Gillian Gould has made a highly significant and unique contribution to AOD research into Indigenous smoking cessation as an early career researcher, obtaining her PhD in 2015. Gould’s PhD by publication was an outstanding contribution to understanding how anti-tobacco messages need to be targeted better to Indigenous communities and in particular, to pregnant smokers. Since moving to University of Newcastle (UON) in 2015, Gould achieved an extremely impressive track record by being awarded $5.5million in funding, and since the start of her PhD, published 39 peer-reviewed papers. She is currently funded by two prestigious research fellowships from NHMRC and Cancer Institute NSW (CINSW) until the end of 2018, and has already secured a NHMRC Translating Research Into Practice Fellowship co-funded by CINSW ($100,000) commencing in 2019. Gould established and leads a new research stream in Indigenous smoking for the School of Medicine and Public Health at UON on culturally competent approaches in the vital area of smoking cessation during pregnancy. Gould is highly effective at combining her extensive clinical experience as a general practitioner, a Tobacco Treatment Specialist and public health researcher to advance knowledge and find pragmatic solutions in this important area. She has worked intensively at a community level with Aboriginal people for several years to build trusted relationships, which allows her to co-develop many Indigenous tobacco programs.
 
The Early Career Award is for excellence in research relative to career opportunities.
 
 
Senior Scientist Award Winner Nicholas Lintzeris 
 
Prof Lintzeris has been highly active for over a quarter of a century in drug and alcohol clinical service delivery, research, professional education and policy developments in Australia and has been a key leader in many important developments in our field across this time. He is Foundation Fellow of the Chapter of Addiction Medicine in the Royal Australasian College of Physicians. He has an international reputation as an expert in the drug and alcohol field with interests across opioids, cannabinoids, stimulants, alcohol, benzodiazepines and ‘new’ psychoactive substances. Prof Lintzeris graduated from the University of Tasmania (MBBS, B Med Sci) then worked in the public drug and alcohol sector in Victoria. He helped establish Turning Point Alcohol and Drug Centre as a lead NGO in the field in Victoria in the 1990s. He subsequently has led drug and alcohol services in South West Sydney, Sydney and South East Sydney Local Health Districts in NSW including important clinical service re-design and innovation. He has been Chief Addiction Medicine specialist for NSW Health, helping develop and implement a clinical outcomes and quality improvement process across public drug and alcohol services throughout NSW that is currently being implemented. He has been highly active in policy development for over two decades, sitting on numerous state and national committees and publishing multiple clinical guidelines in the field. Professor Lintzeris' PhD examined the use of buprenorphine in inpatient and outpatient opiate withdrawal and provided important data to enable the safe and effective rapid uptake of buprenorphine for withdrawal treatment in Australia. He has contributed to state and national opiate treatment guidelines in addiction treatment and played a lead role in the current national and NSW opiate treatment clinical guidelines. He was awarded the Neil Hamilton Fairley Clinical Research Post-doctoral Fellowship by the NH&MRC and led a pivotal RCT of injectable heroin treatment through the National Addiction Centre in the UK as well as psychopharmacological studies of opiates and benzodiazepines.
 
The Senior Scientist Award is for a scientist who has made an outstanding contribution to the field of substance use and misuse.
 
Mentor Award Winner Billie Bonevski 
 
Professor Billie Bonevski is a health behaviour scientist and Professor at the University of Newcastle (UON), Faculty of Health and Medicine. She is a NHMRC Career Development Fellow (CDF Level 2: 2014-2018) and the recipient of the prestigious Faculty of Health and Medicine’s Gladys M Brawn Research Award. Bonevski completed a scholarship-supported PhD at the University of Newcastle, in the Discipline of Behavioural Science in Relation to Medicine after gaining a Psychology Honours degree (1st Class with WH Ward Prize for Best Applied Thesis). Immediately following her PhD she completed a World Health Organisation-sponsored postdoctoral travel fellowship with Cancer Research UK and the Cochrane Collaboration’s Tobacco Addiction Review Group, both based at Oxford University.

"She is a champion for health equity and an advocate for gender equity and this is reflected not only in her research outputs but in her approach to building the capacity of new researchers. Her supportive approach is highly effective; her students and mentees achieve remarkable success in their careers and progress to make substantial contributions to tobacco research and the community in general. She is an inspiring role model (her young female ECR twitter followers refer to her as their "research idol") not only for productivity and achieving career goals, but also for showing them how to ensure their research makes a meaningful difference to people's lives. Evidence of the effectiveness of her mentoring is in the metrics: she has supervised 19 students, 15 of those PhD students, all on PhD scholarships, and 7 winning awards for PhD excellence from their institutions (University of Newcastle, Monash) or national awards (eg, Council of Australian Public Health Institutions, Cancer Institute NSW)."

 The Mentor Award recognises an individual who has made an important contribution to mentoring and supporting the career development of clinicians, researchers or students
 

Congratulations to the 2017 APSAD Award Winners

The APSAD Conference Dinner and Awards was held at The Park overlooking the Albert Park Lake. Incoming APSAD President Dr Tony Gill presented the 2017 APSAD Awards. The recipients of the APSAD Awards are recognised as having made an outstanding contribution to reducing the harms associated with alcohol and other drug use in Australasia. It is a special experience to formally acknowledge the dedication of our peers and celebrate the quality of their work. 

2017 APSAD Award winners resized

Left to right: Briony Larance, Ingrid van Beek, Stephen Ling, Dan Lubman, Scott Wilson

Mentor Award  Dr Ingrid van Beek

Ingrid is a public health and addiction medicine physician who has been a leader in the Harm Minimisation and public health sector for many years. She is renowned and respected both nationally and internationally and has long been the voice of reason social justice and disadvantaged people, such as sex workers, people who inject drugs and at-risk youth. Ingrid was also the founding Medical Director of the first and only Medically Supervised Injecting Centre in the southern hemisphere from 2000 until 2008 and the author of a book “In The Eye Of The Needle” which tells the story of the MSIC, how it came to be, the ongoing controversy, and fight to defend its existence.

The Mentor Award recognises an individual who has made an important contribution to mentoring and supporting the career development of clinicians, researchers or students.

Early Career Award  Dr Briony Larance 

Briony Larance is an NHMRC Australian Public Health Early Career Fellowship recipient and has worked at the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre (NDARC), Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, since 2004. Her research interests include opioid dependence, opioid substitution therapy and pharmaceutical opioids. Her research focuses on understanding the trajectories and health consequences of pharmaceutical opioid use among diverse populations, including chronic pain patients and people who are opioid dependent and/or inject drugs. 

The Early Career Award is for excellence in research relative to career opportunities.+

First Peoples Award  Scott Wilson 

Scott has had an eminent career, being a key advisor to Commonwealth and State Governments in relation to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) alcohol and other drug issues over the past two decades. This includes as the Deputy Co-Chair of the National Indigenous Drug and Alcohol Committee between 2001 and 2014. Amongst his many other contributions, Scott has acted as the Australian delegate to the United Nations “Beyond 2008” International Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) Forum, Vienna. As founding and current CEO of the Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol Council, SA (ADAC) Scott is responsible for delivering a range of innovative services and programs to Aboriginal communities across South Australia. 

The First Peoples Award recognises an individual that has made an important contribution to the advancement of the health of Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander or Māori peoples.

Clinician Award  Stephen Ling  

Stephen Ling is a pioneer nurse practitioner in the alcohol and drug field in Australia. Mr Ling was one of the first of a very small number of clinical nurse consultants in the alcohol and drug field who applied for nurse practitioner status when this became possible. Since attaining this recognition, he has continued to lead the nursing field in NSW, though his clinical work and involvement in teaching and research.

Clinician Award recognises excellence and leadership in clinical practice in substance use in any discipline.

Senior Scientist Award  Prof Dan Lubman

Professor Dan Lubman is a Psychiatrist and Addiction Medicine Specialist. He has worked across mental health and drug treatment settings in both the UK and Australia. He is Director of Turning Point and Professor of Addiction Studies and Services at Monash University. Dr Lubman’s research is wide-ranging and includes investigating the impact of alcohol and drug use on brain function, the relationship between substance use and mental disorder, as well as the development of targeted intervention programs within school, primary care, mental health and drug treatment settings. 

The Senior Scientist Award is for a scientist who has made an outstanding contribution to the field of substance use and misuse.


Congratulations to the 2016 APSAD Award Winners

AWARD WINNER small size

Left to Right: Louisa Degenhardt; Lisa Ferguson; Brad Freeburn; Alison Ritter; Louise Mewton;

Mentor Award  Prof Alison Ritter 

Professor Alison Ritter has been an exemplary mentor in the AOD sector for over twenty years, from her years as Head of Research at Turning Point (1994 – 2006) through to her past decade as the Director of the Drug Policy Modelling Program (2006 – present).  Alison has worked tirelessly to provide support and career advice to her mentees, and does so generously and in accordance with the individual’s own goals, interests and aspirations. Through her leadership of DPMP, Alison has fostered a vibrant and active multi-disciplinary research team, with an international reputation for excellence in drug policy research and demonstrable policy impact.

Alison’s commitment to mentoring extends beyond DPMP. Alison is a thoughtful and generous mentor to early – and mid-career researchers from a range of other institutions and acts as a formal mentor to junior academics in other disciplines at UNSW through ECR mentoring scheme (2010 to present) and in the UNSW Academic Women in Leadership scheme (2010 to present). 

The Mentor Award recognises an individual who has made an important contribution to mentoring and supporting the career development of clinicians, researchers or students.

Early Career Award  Dr Louise Mewton 

Dr Louise Mewton’s exceptional and inspiring contributions to drug and alcohol research have been widely recognised both nationally and internationally.  Focusing on the prevalence, causes and prevention of substance use disorders in young people, her highly innovative program of research makes links across epidemiology, information technology, neuropsychiatry and prevention research, and reflects global research priorities.

The Early Career Award is for excellence in research relative to career opportunities.

First Peoples Award  Bad Freeburn

Brad Freeburn is a Bundjalung man, born at Casino on the North Coast of New South Wales. He is the coordinator of the Drug and Alcohol and Mental Health Unit of the Aboriginal Medical Service Co-op Ltd Redfern. Brad became interested in Indigenous health issues, graduating as an Aboriginal Health Worker in 1993. Having worked in the drug and alcohol field since 1995, before that in the private sector

For the past 20 years, Brad has worked tirelessly to reduce improve the wellbeing of both his clients and advocating for the needs of other Aboriginal people at local, state and national level for culturally appropriate alcohol and other drug services.

The First Peoples Award recognises an individual that has made an important contribution to the advancement of the health of Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander or Māori peoples.

Clinician Award Lisa Ferguson

In her role at St Vincent’s Hospital Sydney Lisa works tirelessly as the only Drug and Alcohol Clinical Nurse Consultant at this 320-bed hospital to ensure patients have access to Drug and Alcohol interventions as well as continuation of care and effective discharge planning for all patients coming through pharmacotherapy treatment. 

Clinician Award recognises excellence and leadership in clinical practice in substance use in any discipline.

Senior Scientist Award  Prof Louisa Degenhardt 

Louisa is an extremely talented and productive researcher and is a global leader in the addiction research field. She has dedicated her career to exploring the complexities of drug-related harm and ensuring policy makers, clinicians and the community have current and comprehensive information to make sound, informed decisions, which of course is crucial in the drug and alcohol field. Her research has already gone a long way to establishing a comprehensive evidence base for drug policy and clinical practice, both in Australia and internationally. Louisa’s work documenting what is and is not known regarding the epidemiology and health effects of illicit drugs has 


Congratulations to the 2015 APSAD Award Winners

2015 Award winnersAward senior scientist

Left to Right: Raimondo Bruno; Amy Peacock; Rose McCrohan; Kathleen James; Steve Allsop; & President Rose Neild

Mentor Award  A/Prof Raimondo Bruno

As a researcher committed to advancing young researchers’ careers before his own, Raimondo Bruno is a worthy winner of the inaugural APSAD Mentor Award. In just 10 years, he has mentored 80 postgraduate students and early career researchers while maintaining many teaching and research roles. His commitment to helping students and young researchers is reflected in results: half of his Clinical Psychology research students are employed in the sector and many have received awards including a Rhodes Scholarship.

Early Career Award  Dr Amy Peacock

Amy Peacock is an emerging leader in the AOD field. She has authored 29 publications and is already an international authority on the harms of mixing alcohol and energy drinks – all within four years of starting her research career. She led the first systematic review published internationally comparing harms of consuming alcohol mixed with energy drinks, and her work has been incorporated into European food safety guidelines.

First Peoples Award  Kathleen James

Kathleen James is an Aboriginal woman who has worked as a counsellor in the addictions field since 2008. Kate is a role model for other Aboriginal staff and clients and provides leadership in providing culturally secure services to the Aboriginal community. She has run youth programs at Banksia Hill Detention Centre and established programs to reach disadvantaged young Aboriginal people, including for students at a local high school, and is currently the only Aboriginal counsellor at the Rockingham branch of Palmerston Association – a not for profit providing counselling and support for people with AOD issues.

Clinician Award  Rose McCrohan

Victoria’s first Alcohol and Other Drug Nurse Practitioner, Rose McCrohan has been a trailblazer in AOD nursing treatment over almost 25 years, managing or helping establish multiple withdrawal programs. “Rose’s knowledge and experience have been invaluable to the sector. Her ability to create an environment for positive change for clients has impacted on many lives,” her nominator said.  Rose is also part of the ReGen team setting up Victoria’s first mother and baby withdrawal service.

Senior Scientist Award  Prof Steve Allsop

Steve Allsop is an internationally renowned researcher in AOD who has made a significant contribution to the field over the past 30 years, including through mentoring many developing researchers. Deputy chair of the Australian National Advisory Council on Alcohol and Drugs, Steve contributes to national and international policy debate and research and has facilitated the debate on state/territory and national drug strategies, including involvement in developing the previous National Amphetamine-Type Stimulants Strategy.